MARKET GROUP VENTURES ANNOUNCES 24V FLEXIBLE LED TAPE

August 8th, 2016

August 03, 2016 – SHAWNIGAN LAKE, BC – Market Group Ventures, the manufacturer of Promolux Lighting officially announced today the conversion from 12V Flexible LED Tape to 24V Flexible LED Tape.

Building on the tremendous success of the Promolux Flexible LED Tape product line, it became clear that producing a 24V version was the best step forward. “We knew we had something special when we launched the 12V version of Promolux Flexible Tape LED this past March,” stated USA Regional Manager, Scott Werhun. “It was so popular; we couldn’t produce it fast enough! We project the new, 24V version to be even more of a hit,” continues Werhun.

The new 24V Promolux Flexible LED Tape comes in 16ft Rolls in Platinum Color, Premium White Color and High Definition 3500K. It installs virtually anywhere and is tremendously versatile.

Reps, distributors and retailers in the United States are encouraged to contact Scott Werhun (scott@mgvinc.com) or Trevor Brien (trevor@mgvinc.com) with questions or for any further information.

For over 30 years Market Group Ventures (Promolux Lighting & Econofrost Night Covers) mgvinc.com has produced innovative retail solutions that merchandise fresh food and save energy – as well as protect and prolong shelf life.  With its head quarters and primary warehouse in North America, Market Group Ventures is a global company with offices in Europe and a distribution network that services more than 30 countries worldwide.

CONTACT: Scott Werhun

USA Regional Manager

Market Group Ventures

1-800-519-1222

scott@mgvinc.com

 

MARKET GROUP VENTURES WELCOMES CODY HENNEBURY TO THE NORTH AMERICAN SALES TEAM

March 2nd, 2016

March 01, 2016 – SHAWNIGAN LAKE, BC – Management & Staff of Market Group Ventures (Promolux Lighting & Econofrost Night Covers) welcome Cody Hennebury to the North American Sales Team.  Joining regional manager, Scott Werhun, Cody will primarily focus on accounts and growth in the USA market.

“Cody’s experience with relationship building and sales management is a tremendous benefit to our team and exactly what we need to continue growing the Econofrost night cover market,” said general manager, Mark Granfar.

Distributors and retailers in the United States are encouraged to contact Cody Hennebury (cody.hennebury@mgvinc.com) or Scott Werhun (scott@mgvinc.com) with questions or for any further information.

For over 30 years Market Group Ventures (Promolux Lighting & Econofrost Night Covers) mgvinc.com has produced innovative retail solutions that merchandise fresh food and save energy – as well as protect and prolong shelf life.  With its head quarters and primary warehouse in North America, Market Group Ventures is a global company with offices in Europe and a distribution network that services more than 30 countries worldwide.

CONTACT: Scott Werhun

USA Regional Manager

Market Group Ventures

1-800-519-1222

scott@mgvinc.com

MARKET GROUP VENTURES WELCOMES SHERRI DROUILLARD TO THE NORTH AMERICAN TEAM

March 2nd, 2016

March 01, 2016 – SHAWNIGAN LAKE, BC – Management & Staff of Market Group Ventures (Promolux Lighting & Econofrost Night Covers) welcome Sherri Drouillard to the North American Sales Team.  Sherri joins the team as Sales Assistant, supporting the regional managers and assisting in the growth of the North American Market.

“Sherri brings a wealth of knowledge in sales, admin and customer service and we are very excited to have her on the team,” said general manager, Mark Granfar.” “We brought Sherri on to replace previous Sales Assistant, Sherry McNeil, who has been officially promoted to Inside Sales Representative,” adds regional manager, Scott Werhun.

Reps, distributors and retailers in the United States are encouraged to contact Scott Werhun (scott@mgvinc.com) or Trevor Brien (trevor@mgvinc.com) with questions or for any further information.

For over 30 years Market Group Ventures (Promolux Lighting & Econofrost Night Covers) mgvinc.com has produced innovative retail solutions that merchandise fresh food and save energy – as well as protect and prolong shelf life.  With its head quarters and primary warehouse in North America, Market Group Ventures is a global company with offices in Europe and a distribution network that services more than 30 countries worldwide.

CONTACT: Scott Werhun

USA Regional Manager

Market Group Ventures

1-800-519-1222

scott@mgvinc.com

 

MARKET GROUP VENTURES WELCOMES SHERRY MCNEIL TO THE SALES TEAM

March 2nd, 2016

March 01, 2016 – SHAWNIGAN LAKE, BC – Management & Staff of Market Group Ventures (Promolux Lighting & Econofrost Night Covers) is excited to announce that Sherry McNeil has been promoted from Sales Assistant to Inside Sales Representative.  Sherry will support the regional managers and assist in the growth of our North American and International Markets.

“Sherry has been with us over two years and has proven to be an excellent and dedicated team member.  The past several months she’s shown the initiative to take on the responsibilities of an Inside Sales Representative, so an official promotion was a natural step,” expressed general manager, Mark Granfar.” USA Regional Manager, Scott Werhun, adds, “I’m excited to have Sherry in a more formal sales role as she proves time and time again that her product knowledge, sales and customer service skills are second to none.”

Reps, distributors and retailers in the United States are encouraged to contact Scott Werhun (scott@mgvinc.com), Trevor Brien (trevor@mgvinc.com) or Sherry McNeil (sherrym@mgvinc.com) with questions or for any further information.

For over 30 years Market Group Ventures (Promolux Lighting & Econofrost Night Covers) mgvinc.com has produced innovative retail solutions that merchandise fresh food and save energy – as well as protect and prolong shelf life.  With its head quarters and primary warehouse in North America, Market Group Ventures is a global company with offices in Europe and a distribution network that services more than 30 countries worldwide.

CONTACT: Scott Werhun

USA Regional Manager

Market Group Ventures

1-800-519-1222

scott@mgvinc.com

PROMOLUX LAUNCHES NEW LED PRODUCT LINE ADDITIONS

February 19th, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 22nd, 2016 – SHAWNIGAN LAKE, BC – Market Group Ventures, Inc. (dba Promolux Lighting) is pleased to announce the addition of four new LED products to their already extensive LED line. The high output Flexible LED Tape, Slimline Bar & Wedge LED, and Track Head LED family are the latest additions to the Promolux LED Product Line.

“The market has been begging us to develop flexible LED tape in the legendary Promolux Platinum color”, explains Sr. Business Development Manager, Scott Werhun. “And we responded.” Available in cuttable 16ft rolls, the Promolux Platinum Flexible LED Tape hits the market mid-March 2016. The flexible tape, along with the new Slimline Bar & Wedge LEDs are available in the Promolux Platinum color formula, making these LEDs ideal for any type of fresh food merchandising.

Providing LEDs in a wide variety of types and sizes, custom LED development and manufacturing, Promolux worked with retailers, lighting specialists and food science specialists – and has turned that knowledge into the best merchandising LED available on the market today!

For further information, please contact Promolux’s regional manager, Scott Werhun (scott@mgvinc.com).

Promolux (led.promolux.com) is considered the pioneer in LEDs developed specifically for fresh food merchandising in supermarkets and grocery stores. With its headquarters and primary warehouse in North America, Promolux is a global company with offices in Europe and a distribution network that services more than 30 countries worldwide.

CONTACT: Scott Werhun
Sr. Business Development Manager
Market Group Ventures
1-800-519-1222
scott@mgvinc.com

Food Waste Represents about 40% of Total Food Production

June 17th, 2015

Food Waste represents about 40% of the total food production in the USA according to the NRDC, the Natural Resource Defense Council in a recent story carried by PBS News Hour and NPR’s Peter Lehner.

One way to reduce this waste at the retail and supermarket point of sale is to reduce the damage caused by light sources. In recent times it was hoped that LEDs would reduce this through eliminating UV but the main damage is still due to photo oxidation and thus even with LED lighting there is considerable food wasted at the point of sale, says Mark Granfar, president of Promolux Lighting International, a firm that has for over 30 years pioneered less damaging light sources for food display.
 

Over 50% of grocery sales in the USA are for perishables that are subject to shrinkage, discoloration, photo oxidation, and changes to the food’s taste and microbial content, making the food unsafe or unlikely to sell. This represents over $260 billion in grocery sales annually.

There is clear evidence from independent studies by the US government, FMI, universities, international agencies such as the FAO, and others that lighting has a damaging effect on the quality, safety, and shelf life of all perishable foods.

Radiation from the choice of lighting has been proven to have an effect on product surface temperatures, directly and exponentially accelerating microbial growth and leading to unsafe foods.

In tests conducted by Promolux, the return on investment for low radiation lighting in seafood departments can be a matter of weeks, while deli departments with packaged and processed meats can show a longer payback.

The choice of lighting has been proven to have an effect on surface temperature and radiation that can directly and exponentially accelerate microbial growth, leading to unsafe foods. The cost of such food borne illnesses in the USA represents between $5 and $6 billion a year (University of Kansas), not including insurance & liability costs and the reputation and good will equity of the supermarkets involved.

The cost to the industry varies from 3% for some categories to 15% in seafood department shrinkage in US supermarkets (FMI, 1987). Even a conservative average of 5% results in over $13 billion in shrinkage in those departments.

Other products such as beer, wines, and glass packaged foods, which appear to be non perishable, are clearly affected by exposure to lighting.

Food Waste Reduction

June 16th, 2015

CBC reports that France is in the midst of a push to cut their food waste in half by 2025, from the current level of 20-30 kg per person, or as much as $27 billion per year total. Other efforts include targeting school cafeteria waste, educating students about reducing waste at home and eliminating best-before dates on non-perishable items.

Last December, a study reported that Canadians waste $31 billion worth of food annually, with 10 per cent of that coming from grocery stores. An investigation by APTN last year called “Wasting Away” revealed that this even happens in Nunavut, home to some of the highest food prices in Canada. Controversy erupted after elders were spotted scavenging for food at the Rankin Inlet dump.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture reports that Americans’ annual food waste was worth $161 billion in 2010, or 133 billion pounds total. Ten per cent of that was attributed to grocery stores.

Canada doesn’t have legislation like France’s ground breaking new law, but the Real Canadian Superstore and No Frills grocery store chains recently announced they are trying to reduce food waste by selling “Naturally Imperfect” produce at a 30 per cent discount. This is similar to French chain ‘s Intermarché’s “inglorious” fruits and vegetables which are sold at a similarly reduced price.

France to Require Large Grocery Stores to Give Unsold Food to Charities

One way to reduce this waste at the retail and supermarket point of sale is to reduce the damage caused by light sources. In recent times it was hoped that LEDs would reduce this through eliminating UV but the main damage is still due to photo oxidation and thus even with LED lighting there is considerable food wasted at the point of sale, says Mark Granfar, president of Promolux Lighting International, a firm that has for over 30 years pioneered less damaging light sources for food display.

Over 50% of grocery sales in the USA are for perishables that are subject to shrinkage, discoloration, photo oxidation, and changes to the food’s taste and microbial content, making the food unsafe or unlikely to sell. This represents over $260 billion in grocery sales annually.

There is clear evidence from independent studies by the US government, FMI, universities, international agencies such as the FAO, and others that lighting has a damaging effect on the quality, safety, and shelf life of all perishable foods.

Radiation from the choice of lighting has been proven to have an effect on product surface temperatures, directly and exponentially accelerating microbial growth and leading to unsafe foods.

In tests conducted by Promolux, the return on investment for low radiation lighting in seafood departments can be a matter of weeks, while deli departments with packaged and processed meats can show a longer payback.

The choice of lighting has been proven to have an effect on surface temperature and radiation that can directly and exponentially accelerate microbial growth, leading to unsafe foods. The cost of such food borne illnesses in the USA represents between $5 and $6 billion a year (University of Kansas), not including insurance & liability costs and the reputation and good will equity of the supermarkets involved.

The cost to the industry varies from 3% for some categories to 15% in seafood department shrinkage in US supermarkets (FMI, 1987). Even a conservative average of 5% results in over $13 billion in shrinkage in those departments.

Other products such as beer, wines, and glass packaged foods, which appear to be non-perishable, are clearly affected by exposure to lighting.

According to the National Cattlemen’s Association in 2002, “US retailers failed to capture at least $1 billion annually from fresh beef sales due to product discoloration.”

Based on the evidence and published reports, we can estimate the damage caused by lighting to perishables in retail display at over 33% of this shrinkage, which represents over $4 billion a year in the US alone. This estimate is a conservative one when we consider that according to the National Cattlemen’s Association in 2002, “US retailers failed to capture at least $1 billion annually from fresh beef sales due to product discoloration.” This estimate does not include other meat products besides beef, nor processed meats, fish, poultry, dairy and all other perishables.

Of the estimated shrinkage costs to US supermarkets of over $4 billion due to lighting, and a significant portion can be saved by reducing the radiation of the light sources and by eliminating certain wavelengths of visible and nonvisible radiation that are particularly harmful to food safety and shelf life.

The End of CRI

March 12th, 2015

The company I work for has been in business in North America since 1982 and is considered the pioneer in food-specific merchandising lighting.

 

We’ve manufactured and sold millions of lights worldwide, and built a reputation for creating the best lighting for showcasing perishable food

and we did it by NEVER relying on the Color Rendering Index (CRI)!

 

In August 2014 the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) wrote a position statement finally recognizing that CRI is an outdated metric with shortcomings, “that limit its ability to fully represent how humans perceive color.” http://www.ies.org/PDF/PositionStatements/PS-8-14.pdf

 

When I joined this company one of the first things I learned is that decisions to purchase fresh food are subjective. As consumers, we buy based on what we perceive to be fresh and appealing. If we feel that something doesn’t look fresh, we will sift through the product until we find one that does look fresh – or worse yet, we might even go to a different supermarket. When it comes to fresh food merchandising color plays an important role – some say the most important role!

cri_not_relevant
As retailers and merchandisers, distributors, designers and reps, we all might subconsciously realize those buying decisions are subjective; but the real benefit comes when we consciously realize it – because we can do something about it.

 

The only real way to know how good a particular LED is at showcasing foods’ natural colors is to see it. How does it make the product look? Is it a vibrant display? Are the reds, “red” and the whites, “white”, and so on?

 

One simply can’t rely on numbers on a piece of paper (ie. CRI, Kelvin, etc) to answer those questions – it’s impossible. You have to see for yourself. Over the years if anyone has visited our websites (led.promolux.com or promolux.com) they’ll notice our CRI and Kelvin is not listed anywhere. We do that for a reason – because the only way you’ll know for certain if an LED will showcase your food in the best possible way is to see it for yourself. Yes, that means we get calls now and then asking for our CRI and Kelvin – and we always provide it without hesitation – but not without first giving the “see for yourself” suggestion.

 

Even after this post, I’m sure we’ll still get calls from time to time asking for our CRI – but now perhaps when deciding on an LED to use in fresh food display cases, more people will understand that it’s time to let go of CRI, let go of trying to decide by looking at numbers on a piece of paper, and instead say, “let’s see how this LED makes our food look; let’s see for ourselves!”

The Right Lighting is a Merchandising Tool

December 18th, 2014

I can almost guarantee that today there’s one consistent message virtually every supermarket promotes: that they have safe-to-eat, quality fresh food.

In an industry where mass merchandisers and supercenters grind down prices of center store products, supermarkets use fresh food sections as a competitive tool; retailers rely on their perishable food displays to attract customers and promote impulse sales. Fresh foods are a lifestyle choice for most consumers and a strategic necessity for supermarkets.

Consumers can choose from any number of supermarkets in their neighborhood, so retailers spend thousands on advertising – just to get them to come into their store. Then inside the store, supermarkets spend hundreds of thousands designing perishable food departments and purchasing display cases – all in an effort to get consumers to notice and buy their fresh food.

Yet, after all the care and cost put into the perishable department and display cases, the lights used to merchandise the very product they are trying to attract our attention to are often overlooked and the cheapest, most visually unappealing lights are used!

Using the right lighting is a merchandising tool because decisions to purchase fresh food are subjective! Lighting designed specifically for fresh food merchandising, such as Promolux balanced spectrum, low radiation LEDs & fluorescents, ensure perishable displays get noticed and allow food’s vibrant, natural colors to pop creating a visual ‘wow’!

Retailers across the nation who use Promolux lighting do so because they know consumers buy based on what they perceive to be fresh and appealing. We’ve all opted for one supermarket over another because the fresh meat looks better here, or the produce looks better there. That decision is the “moment of truth” – once inside the store, does the customer buy or not buy?

Customers make their “buy or don’t buy” decision based on eye appeal; fresh food is naturally colorful and retailers across the nation strive to bring that color to the attention of their customers. From a supermarket’s perspective it’s a waste of money if, after all the expense incurred just to get a customer into their store, that customer leaves without buying – because the steak didn’t look good to them or it didn’t appear fresh. The lighting used to showcase a retailer’s fresh food makes world of difference and can easily be the deciding factor in how a customer perceives a food’s freshness and a supermarket’s quality image.

The mindset that all lights are the same is one of the most critical mistakes made in the retail industry; the light in the ceiling should never be used to merchandise the product to be sold! Regular lighting is designed to be as bright as bright as possible using the least amount of energy with no consideration given to the quality of color it displays. For a retailer, the lighting used to showcase the product they’re trying to sell must make that product look fresh and appealing! Fresh food has a time limit – if it doesn’t sell before it goes bad, it goes into the garbage.

Perishable departments have a profit margin of 50% or more – this is where they make their money! Merchandising fresh food with an LED or fluorescent with a balanced color spectrum that’s specifically designed for food ensures perishable displays get noticed. As retailers and merchandisers, we’ve done our job when a customer buys a steak because it looked so good that they visualized cooking it for dinner and imagined how amazing it would taste – all based on how it looked to them when it was inside the display case.

By Scott Werhun, Regional Manager, Promolux Lighting International

Market Group Ventures welcomes Krista Hoffert to the North American Sales Team

December 16th, 2014

SHAWNIGAN LAKE, BC – Management & Staff of Market Group Ventures (Promolux LEDs, Promolux Lighting & Econofrost Night Covers) welcome Krista Hoffert to the North American Sales Team. Krista joins the team to support the regional managers and assist in the growth of the North American Market.

“Krista brings a wealth of knowledge in sales and customer service and we are very excited to have her on the team,” said general manager, Mark Granfar. “Krista is an excellent addition to the team and she’s already shown amazing promise in only her first week,” adds regional manager, Jamey Farr.

Reps, distributors and retailers in the United States are encouraged to contact Scott Werhun (scott@mgvinc.com) or Jamey Farr (james.farr@mgvinc.com) with questions or for any further information.

For over 30 years Market Group Ventures (www.mgvinc.com) has produced innovative retail solutions that save energy as well as protect and prolong the shelf life of perishable foods. With its head quarters and primary warehouse in North America, Market Group Ventures is a global company with offices in Europe and a distribution network that services more than 30 countries worldwide.